Networking

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If you have one of Western Digital’s My Cloud nstorage drives, you might be particularly vulnerable to internet attacks. Exploitee.rs has discovered a number of unpatched security flaws in most My Cloud models that let remote intruders bypass the login, insert their own commands and upload files without permission. In numerous cases, it’s a matter of poorly implemented scripts. Also, every command exectued through the web interface has full access to the operating system — an attacker would have the keys to the kingdom.

The kicker? WD did fix one login bypass flaw through a firmware update, but it introduced another in the process.

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If malware uses a remote command-and-control server to function, it’s relatively easy to cripple it by blocking the internet addresses it uses. It’s not always that easy, however, and researchers at Cisco’s Talos group have found a textbook example of this in action. A recently discovered Windows PowerShell trojan, DNSMessenger, uses the Domain Name Service for communication — you know, one of the cornerstones of the internet.

Few computer users are equipped to block DNS without causing other problems, and they might not notice unusual data traffic even if they’re looking for it. While using DNS isn’t completely unheard of, DNSMessenger uses an “extremely uncommon” two-way approach that both sends commands to victim machines and sends results back to the attacker.

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Facebook last week launched new features for advertising job openings on the network.

Although many companies already have been using Facebook to find workers, the new functionality formalizes its job search capabilities, the company said.

U.S. and Canadian businesses can use the company’s new jobs bookmark to list open positions and allow users to apply directly from the site.

Page administrators can track applicants and communicate directly with them using messenger. They also can boost job postings to reach a larger audience.

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For a long time, Google Fiber was the most exciting broadband provider out there. Cities wanted it, tech people drooled over it; and on a loftier level, it even promised to help bridge the “digital divide” between rich and poor. But now, things are looking bleak: Yesterday, Bloomberg reported that Google Fiber is being scaled back dramatically (again) as it named Greg McCray its new CEO, with “several hundred” of its employees in that division being sent to other areas of the company.

Google Fiber, part of the Access division of Google’s parent company Alphabet, was launched in 2010 in Kansas City, providing gigabit broadband and TV services over fiber optic cables.

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The Internet of Things, or IoT, seems to be the big headline in tech news lately.

Perhaps you’ve heard of smart remotes, outlets, thermostats or alarm systems, but with all the recent development in this area, there are probably quite a few devices that you haven’t yet considered. Here are six worth adding to your tech radar.

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This is my promised column on data security and the Internet of Things (IoT). The recent Dyn DDoS attack showed the IoT is going to be a huge problem as networked devices like webcams are turned into zombie hoards. Fortunately I think I may have a solution to the problem. Really.

I’m an idiot today, but back in the early 1990’s I ran a startup that built one of the Internet’s earliest Content Distribution Networks (CDN), only we didn’t call it that because the term had not yet been invented.

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Network outages are a major source of pain for businesses, so understanding what causes them is an important part of preventing them in the first place.

A new survey from Veriflow reveals that complexity and human error are high on the list as contributing to network problems.

Of 300 plus network professionals responding to the survey, 97 percent admit that human factors cause network outages.

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You don’t need a massive botnet to launch overwhelming denial of service attacks — in some cases, a personal PC and so-so broadband are all that’s required. Researchers at TDC Security Operations Center have revealed a new attack technique, BlackNurse, that can take down large servers using just one computer (in this case, a laptop) and at least 15Mbps of bandwidth.

Instead of bombarding a server with traffic, you send specially formed Internet Control Message Protocol packets that overwhelm the processors on server firewalls from Cisco, Palo Alto Networks and others. The firewalls end up dropping so much data that they effectively knock servers out of commission, even if they have tons of network capacity.

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A key hurdle to widespread gigabit-speed Internet is the high cost of getting fiber optic lines over the last mile — from the fiber backbone in nearby streets to each house.

But increasingly, cellular operators, broadband providers including Google Fiber and several startups are exploring a new, less expensive way to bridge the last mile gap – wireless technology.

Google Fiber – which named San Diego as a potential city for building an ultra-fast fiber optic Internet network — said last month that it would pause future fiber optic roll outs in San Diego and seven other potential Google Fiber cities while it explored new approaches.

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The U.S. government just relinquished control over one very large entity — the internet. As of Saturday, October 1, the federal National Telecommunications and Information Administration no longer exercises control over the Internet Corporation for Assigned Names and Numbers (ICANN), which has long been the manager of internet domain names. But now, ICANN is truly an independent non-profit, free from the oversight of the American government.

Instead, as an autonomous not for profit organization, ICANN will now answer to international stakeholders across the internet community, including a governmental advisory committee, a technical committee, industry committee, internet users, and telecommunications experts.

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